Terms of Endearment

Terms of endearment are words and phrases meant to express regard and relationship, caring and connection, intimacy and affection – to specific individuals.

How we think, feel, and talk is greatly influenced by words we know and use.

The words we use (by choice or habit, from those known and available to us) reflect and express our thoughts, feelings, beliefs, values, needs, and desires – especially regarding ourselves, others, and our relationship(s) with them.

Words (and the ideas they represent) often differ from language to language, culture to culture, and individual to individual – as do their meanings and use.

How (spoken) love and affection is expressed varies by language and culture.

Some languages have or don’t have words or usages that others do or do not.

Many people seem to use terms of endearment referring or related to food.

In English, this includes:

    Buttercup
    Candy, Candy Man, Candy Pants
    Cheese
    Cherry
    Cookie
    Cupcake
    Dumpling
    Hon, Honey, Honey Bun, Honey Bunny, Honey Bunch, Honey Pie
    Kumquat
    Lambchop
    Muffin
    Peaches
    Pudding
    Pumpkin
    Shug, Sugar, Sugar Booger, Sugar Bun, Sugar Pie, Sugar Plum, Sugar Puss
    Sweets, Sweetest, Sweetness, Sweetie
    Sweetie Pie, Sweet Potato, Sweet Pea
    Toots, Tootsie, Tootsie Roll

Foods referred to in other languages are sometimes quite different:

In Spanish, there is:

    Albondiga (Meatball)
    Frutita (Little Fruit)
    Mi Mielecita (My Little Honey)
    Mi Turrón de Azúcar (My Sugar Cube/Lump of Sugar)
    Verdurita (Little Vegetable)
    Mi Torta (My Mexican Sandwich)
    [Torta is also slang for Ass]
    Mi Rajada de Papaya (My Slice of Papaya)
    [Papaya is Cuban slang for Vagina]


French:

    Petit Chou (Little Cabbage)
    Chou (Cabbage or French Puff Pastry Bun/”Sweetheart”)
    Chouchou (“Darling”)
    Mon Coco (My Coconut?)


Portuguese:

    Chuchuzinho (Little Squash/Pumpkin)


Finnish:

    Muru (Breadcrumb)


Dutch:

    Dropje (Licorice), Droppie (Little Liquorice)
    Snoepje (Candy)


Korean:

    Yobo (Honey)


Persian (Farsi):

    Sheereen (Sweet – similar to calling someone Honey or Sweetie)
    Nazanim-am (My Sweetest – or Dearest)
    Asal (Honey)
    [not very common but still you can use it]
    Jigar (
    very informal used as “Sweetie” – but literally means Liver)
    Jigar-Tala (
    very informal “Sweetie”) [Tala means Gold; Jigar means Liver]


Terms related to infancy or animals are also common.

In English:

    Babe, Baby, Baby Cakes, Baby Doll, Baby Girl
    Chick, Chickadee
    Dove
    Huggie Bear
    Kitten
    Pussy, Pussycat
    Tiger


In Spanish:

    Bicho (Bug), Bichito (Little Bug).
    Palomita (Little Dove)


French:

    Ma Biquette, Ma Biche (My Doe, My Female Deer)
    Mon Lapin (My Rabbit, My Bunny),
    Ma Poule (My Hen), Mon Poulet (My Chicken)
    Ma Puce (My flea/“Sweetie”)


In Italian:

    Gatto (“Kitty”)


Persian (Farsi):

    Moosh moosh-am (My mousy mouse)


Portuguese:

    Ursolina (Little Female Bear)


Thai:

    Chang Noi (Little Elephant)
    “Duckling”
    [phonetically, “Duck Ling” means “Monkey’s Ass” in Thai]


Russian:

    Golubchik/Golubushka (Little Dove)
    Pupsik (Little Bird)
    Zaychik/Zayka” (Little Hare)


Arabic:

    Ghazal (Gazelle)


German:

    Mein Spatzle/Mein Spatzchen (My Little Sparrow/“Sweetheart”/Pasta)
    Mausi (Mouse)
    Hasi (Bunny)
    Gummibaerchen (Gummi Bear)

Also common are terms related to appearance:

English:

    Beautiful
    Cuteness, Cutie, Cutie Patootie, Cutie Pie
    Doll, Doll Face
    Good Lookin’
    Gorgeous
    Handsome
    Little One
    Pinup
    Shawty, Shorty, Short Stuff


Filipino (Tagalog):

    Ganda, Maganda (Beautiful)
    Pangit (Ugly)
    Pogi (Good-Looking Male)


strong>Persian (Farsi):

    Kopol or Kopolak (Chubby-Cute in reference to a fat boy)


But NO term is dearer than “Beloved”

Similar terms in English include:

    Better Half, Other Half
    Darling
    Dear, Dearest
    Dream Boat, Dream Girl
    Heart’s Dearest, Heart’s Delight, Heart’s Desire
    Lady Love
    Life Partner
    Love, Luv Luv, Love of My Life
    Man/Woman of My Dreams
    My Beloved Bride
    My Handsome Husband
    My Heart’s Desire
    My Love
    My Queen
    My True Love
    Old Lady/Old Man
    Soul Mate
    True Love
    Wife


In Spanish:

    Amigita (Little Girlfriend)
    (Mi) Amor (My Love), Amor Mio (Love of Mine)
    (Mi) Amada (My Beloved), Amada Mia (Beloved of Mine)
    Adorada Mia (My Adored One)
    Mi Alma (My Soul)
    Mi Bello Amanecer” (Mi Beautiful Dawning)
    (Mi) Cielo (My Sky)
    (Mi) Corazon (My Heart), Mi Corazoncito (My Little Heart)
    Querida (Beloved)
    Mi Reina (My Queen)
    Mi Rey (My King)
    (Mi) Vida (My Life), Vida Mia (Life of Mine)

    Cosita (Little Thing)
    Gordo/Gorda (Fatty)
    (Mi) Viejo/Vieja (My Old One)


Turkish:

    Canim (My Soul/”Darling”)
    Patlicanim (“My Aubergine”)


Persian (Farsi):

    Aziz-am (My Dear)
    Aziz-e Del-am (the Dear of my Heart)
    Eshgh-am (My Love)
    Joon-am (My Life)
    Omr-am (My Life force)
    Rooham (My Soul)
    Jane Del-am (the Life of My Heart)
    Atashe Del-am (the Fire of My Heart)
    Nafaseman (My Breath)
    Noore Cheshm-am (the Light of My Eyes)
    Delbar-am (the one who has My Heart – one’s Soulmate or True Love)
    Hamsar-am (My Equal Head – referring to one’s Spouse)
    Khanoomi (Missy)

    -jan (dear) [used at the END of names]


Filipino (Tagalog):

    Mahal Ko (My Love)
    Ga, Pinalangga (Beloved)


French:

    Ma Mie, Mon Amie (My Pal)
    Ma Belle (My Beautiful One)
    Mon Cheri (My Dear)


Arabic:

    Habibi


Gaelic:

    Mo Chuisle (My Pulse)


Chinese:

    Chen Yu Luo Yan (Diving Fish Swooping Geese)
    Bao Bei (Treasure/“Darling”)


Japanese:

    *There aren’t any?*
    You can add “chan” (baby) to someone’s first name … in a bind.
    Or maybe
    Tamago Gata No Kao (Egg With Eyes)


Korean:

    Chagiya (Darling)
    Oppa (Older Male)


Vietnamese:

    Anh Yeu (Male Loved)
    Em Yeu (Female Loved)
    Cưng (Cheri Lovey – for both male and female)


Indonesian:

    Buah Hatiku (Fruit of My Heart)


Tibetan:

    Nyingdu-la (Most Honored Poison of My Heart)


Odawa (Native American):

    Gdab (“Beloved”)


German:

    Schatzi (Treasure)


Dutch:

    Iefje (Darling)
    Schatje (Little Treasure)


Danish:

    Skat (Treasure/”Taxes”)


Other common terms of endearment in English include:

    Angel, Angel Face
    Big Boy, Big Daddy
    Boo, Boo Boo
    Booger
    Champ
    Charming
    Girlfriend
    Hot Lips, Hot Stuff
    Hunk
    Lover Boy, Lover Girl
    Mama
    Pookie
    Precious
    Prince, Princess
    Sexy, Sexy Beast, Sexy Mama, Sexy Thang
    Sleepy Head
    Smiley
    Smoochy-kins
    Snoogums
    Snuggles
    Sparkles, Sparky
    Stud, Stud Muffin
    Sunny, Sunshine
    Sweet Cheeks, Sweet Heart, Sweet Lips, Sweet Pants, Sweet Stuff
    Trouble
    Treasure
    Wonderful


Other common terms for a loved one in Spanish include:

    Muñeca (Baby Doll/Wrist)
    Cari/Cariño (Love/Affection)
    Dulce (Sweet)

    Mami (Mommy)
    Papi (Daddy)

      The “diminutive” ita/ito is also often added at the end of a word – to express affection


The French sometimes say things like:

    Ma Petite Crotte (My Little Turd)


And the Dutch sometimes call those they like:

    Poepie (Little Poop)
    Poepje (Little Fart)
    Scheetje (Little Fart)